Press Release

EMC Showcases Enterprise Storage for Windows NT-Based Business Solutions

Symmetrix Systems Utilized in Demonstrations at First-Ever Microsoft Business Applications Conference

Las Vegas,, Wednesday, September 9, 1998 - 

EMC Corporation, the world's leading provider of enterprise storage systems and software, today announced that its Symmetrix Enterprise Storage systems are supporting demonstrations of Windows NT-based applications at Microsoft's first-ever Business Applications Conference. EMC's Symmetrix systems are the only storage solution supporting the five conference tracks.

Two EMC Symmetrix Enterprise Storage systems, attached to clustered IBM Netfinity Windows NT servers, are enabling demonstrations that link Microsoft BackOffice products with enterprise solutions from SAP and Baan. Senior Microsoft executives, including president Steve Ballmer and senior researcher Dr. Jim Gray are scheduled to present keynotes referencing the demonstration systems.

"The focus of this inaugural event is to show how customers can best combine Microsoft BackOffice with partner products, custom applications and legacy systems to create complete enterprise solutions," said James Utzschneider, director of line of business evangelism at Microsoft. "EMC's Symmetrix Enterprise Storage systems are providing users with examples of how to consolidate information to improve information management and availability in Windows NT environments."

The two EMC Symmetrix Enterprise Storage systems will also feature EMC TimeFinder software. TimeFinder will create multiple copies of production data to simulate information sharing as well as backup and testing capabilities in a mission-critical Windows NT environment. By combining EMC Enterprise Storage with BackOffice products from Microsoft, users can create more robust implementations of what Microsoft calls a "Digital Nervous System" to address integration problems for key business processes, such as e-commerce, service tracking, collaboration and business intelligence.

Jim Pearson, EMC's Vice President of Enterprise Alliances, said, "As customers begin to implement mission-critical Windows NT environments, EMC Enterprise Storage will enable a seamless transition from mainframes or UNIX platforms to Windows NT with the highest levels of reliability, manageability and flexibility. Users are able to customize and distribute their applications to fit their needs, while centrally managing, protecting and sharing the critical information now generated and processed by these platforms."

EMC Symmetrix Enterprise Storage systems are approved to carry the "Designed for Microsoft BackOffice" logo and are listed on Microsoft's Hardware Compatibility List for "Storage/RAID" and "clustered" Microsoft Windows NT environments. Symmetrix systems have been providing storage support for Windows NT platforms for over two years.

EMC Corporation, a Fortune 500 company based in Hopkinton, Massachusetts, is the world's technology and market leader in the rapidly growing market for intelligent enterprise storage systems, software and services. The company's products store, retrieve, manage, protect and share information from all major computing environments, including UNIX, Windows NT and mainframe platforms. The company has offices worldwide, trades on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol EMC, and is a component of the S&P 500 Index. For further information about EMC and its storage solutions, EMC's corporate Web site can be accessed at http://www.EMC.com.

Sponsored by Microsoft, the Business Applications Conference 98 is a technical how-to workshop for the integration of real world solutions. The first-ever conference is designed to educate developers, systems integrators, systems architects and independent software vendors (ISVs) on how to link disparate computer systems and line-of-business applications into complete, end-to-end solutions. The conference is the latest effort in Microsoft's ongoing commitment to helping developers and customers realize the vision of a "Digital Nervous System."

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