Global Sales Contact List

Contact   A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

RSA Laboratories

3.1.1 What is the RSA cryptosystem?

The RSA cryptosystem is a public-key cryptosystem that offers both encryption and digital signatures (authentication). Ronald Rivest, Adi Shamir, and Leonard Adleman developed the RSA system in 1977 [RSA78]; RSA stands for the first letter in each of its inventors' last names.

The RSA algorithm works as follows: take two large primes, p and q, and compute their product n = pq; n is called the modulus. Choose a number, e, less than n and relatively prime to (p-1)(q-1), which means e and (p-1)(q-1) have no common factors except 1. Find another number d such that (ed - 1) is divisible by (p-1)(q-1). The values e and d are called the public and private exponents, respectively. The public key is the pair (n, e); the private key is (n, d). The factors p and q may be destroyed or kept with the private key.

It is currently difficult to obtain the private key d from the public key (n, e). However if one could factor n into p and q, then one could obtain the private key d. Thus the security of the RSA system is based on the assumption that factoring is difficult. The discovery of an easy method of factoring would "break" RSA (see Question 3.1.3 and Question 2.3.3).

Here is how the RSA system can be used for encryption and digital signatures (in practice, the actual use is slightly different; see Questions 3.1.7 and 3.1.8):

Encryption

Suppose Alice wants to send a message m to Bob. Alice creates the ciphertext c by exponentiating: c = me mod n, where e and n are Bob's public key. She sends c to Bob. To decrypt, Bob also exponentiates: m = cd mod n; the relationship between e and d ensures that Bob correctly recovers m. Since only Bob knows d, only Bob can decrypt this message.

Digital Signature

Suppose Alice wants to send a message m to Bob in such a way that Bob is assured the message is both authentic, has not been tampered with, and from Alice. Alice creates a digital signature s by exponentiating: s = md mod n, where d and n are Alice's private key. She sends m and s to Bob. To verify the signature, Bob exponentiates and checks that the message m is recovered: m = se mod n, where e and n are Alice's public key.

Thus encryption and authentication take place without any sharing of private keys: each person uses only another's public key or their own private key. Anyone can send an encrypted message or verify a signed message, but only someone in possession of the correct private key can decrypt or sign a message.


Top of the page

Notes:
Connect with EMCConnect with EMC
Need help immediately? EMC Sales Specialists are standing by to answer your questions real time.
Use Live Chat for fast, direct access to EMC Customer Service Professionals to resolve your support questions.
Explore and compare EMC products in the EMC Store, and get a price quote from EMC or an EMC partner.
We're here to help. Send us your sales inquiry and an EMC Sales Specialist will get back to you within one business day.
Want to talk? Call us to speak with an EMC Sales Specialist live.